How To: Reassemble your Ruger M77 Mark II or Hawkeye Rifle

Reassemble your Ruger M77 Mark II or Hawkeye Rifle

How to Reassemble your Ruger M77 Mark II or Hawkeye Rifle

If you own a Ruger firearm, maybe it's about time you learned everything there is to know about it. If you have a Ruger rifle, you might want to know how to take it apart, or how to clean it, or how to put it back together, or maybe how to add a scope to it. Ruger is an "arms maker for responsible citizens," so don't let those other firearms manufacturers fool you. Learn from the professionals, learn from Ruger in this weapons video tutorial.

This instructional will show you how to reassemble your Ruger M77 Mark II or Hawkeye Rifle. This tech tip from Ruger will show you the exact reassembly steps to help you make sure you do it right.

The Ruger M77 Mark II rifles are advanced bolt action hunting rifles. Giving the best value for the money, Ruger M77 Mark II rifles embody the rugged strength of the proven Ruger bolt action with advanced features such as integral scope bases which can never shoot loose, a diagonally angled foreign screw to securely pull the barreled action down into the stock for accurate shooting, and a positive floor plate latch which allows easy unloading but prevents accidental dumping of cartridges. They also feature a three-position safety that allows for safe loading or unloading with the safety "on" and hammer forged barrels for accuracy, made entirely in the United States of America.

The Ruger M77 Hawkeye rifles offer shooters a host of features and functional enhancements that deliver top value and provide rewarding shooting experience. With the enhanced ergonomics, improved checkering of the walnut stock, and the new LC6 trigger, Ruger M77 Hawkeye rifles will impress knowledgeable shooters with their performance-improving features. In addition, these bolt action rifles contain all the value-added characteristics of yesterday's Ruger rifles- positive floor plate latch, integral scope mounts, three-position safety and hammer forged barrels, and of course they're made in America.

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